Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Wrongly Titled Post

Fr. John Zuhlsdorf is the 'blogmaster of one of the best Catholic 'blogs on the internet, "What Does The Prayer Really Say."

He calls his latest post a rant.

I call it a much needed sermon.

A Priest Forever


Today marks the 60th. anniversary of the ordination to the priesthood of Joseph Ratzinger, now known as Pope Benedict XVI.

Keep all priests in your prayers. You never know where their calling takes them.

Double Praise


The Apostle to the Jews and the Apostle to the Gentiles.

He upon whom the Church is built and he who was one of Her busiest missionaries and eloquent preachers.

Both came to Christ from different paths, both endured their hardships, but both ran the race to the end.

Once upon a time, their respective feast days were separate. Now, they are celebrated together.

We are blessed to have such great teachers and leaders of the Faith.

Sunday, June 26, 2011

Chant Comes Here

The Church Music Association of America has announced the site for Colloquium XXII, to be held June 25-July 1, 2012.

Their next "seven days of musical heaven" will be here.

Once again, a significant liturgical practicum will be in my backyard.

I have already offered to help.

365 days and counting.

I can't wait.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Missing Links

My 201o St. Cecilia's Day post mentions a litany to the patron saint of music used by members of the Church Music Association of America. This prayer is used as a novena beginning the 22nd. of each month. The forum post has links to both a recited and chant form, the chant having been composed by a member of the CMAA.

There has been a small problem. The links to copies of each form have been unavailable for quite a while now. No one wanting copies have been able to secure any.

Until now.

Via Google Docs, here are new links to the recited (Word) and chant (PDF) form.

For now, I hope this will be useful. I would eventually like to link to the originals, but I will need help with that.

You're welcome.

(UPDATE) The forum actually allows me to attach my copies to the post. So I did. The offer to link them still stands.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Long May It Wave


**********

1892-1923

I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands: one Nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

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1923-1954

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands: one Nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

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1954-Present

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands: one Nation under God, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

**********

A brief history of the pledge can be found here.
A brief history about the day can be found here.
A brief history about the flag can be found here.

**********

Stories regarding burning of the flag as an act of protest against the country are numerous. A local radio announcer recorded this essay about respecting this country's most important and visible symbol (transcription is mine):
Hello. Remember me? Some people call me Old Glory. Others call me the Star-Spangled Banner. But, whatever they call me, I'm your flag--the flag of the United States of America. Something has been bothering me. I thought I might talk it over with you, because it's about you and me.

I remember some time ago people would line up on both sides of the street to watch the parade. Naturally, I was leading every one of them, proudly waving in the breeze. When your Daddy saw me coming, he removed his hat, placed it over his left shoulder so that his hand was over his heart. Remember? And you. I remember you standing there, straight as a soldier. You didn't have a hat, but you were giving the right salute. Remember your little sister? Not to be outdone, she was saluting the same as you, with her right hand over her heart. Remember?

What happened? I'm still the same old flag. Oh, I've added a few more stars since you were a boy. A lot more blood has been shed since those parades of long ago. But now, somehow, I don't feel as proud as I used to feel. Now when I come down your street, you just stand there with your hands in your pockets. You may give me a small glance, then you look away. I see children running around you shouting; they don't seem to know who I am. I saw one man take his hat off and then he looked around; and when he didn't see anyone else take their hat off, he quickly put his back on again.

Is is a sin to be patriotic today? Have you forgotten what I stand for and where I have been? Take a look at the memorial honor rolls; see the names of those patriotic Americans who gave their lives to keep this Republic free. When you salute me, you are actually saluting them.

Well, it won't be long until I'm coming down your street again. So when you see me, please-- stand straight, place your hand over your heart, and I'll know that you remember. I'll salute you by waving back.
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Originally posted 6/14/2006.

Here In This Place

And so it has begun.

I wish I could be there, but my wallet said, "No way." The spirit is willing; the cash is non-existent.

I shouldn't be too disappointed. I have actually attended what I consider to be the last four of the last five "major" events sponsored by the Church Music Association of America--
  1. January,2010: Winter Chant Intensive; Charleston, SC.
  2. June, 2010: CMAA Colloquium XX; Pittsburgh, PA.
  3. October, 2010: Fall Practicum; Houston, TX.
  4. January, 2011: Winter Chant Intensive; New Orleans, LA.
It is a very educational as well as spiritually uplifting time. It is truly, as they like to promote, "Seven Days of Musical Heaven."

One of the more recent forums at the CMAA website was a roll call of attendees. While I made my regrets, I also said I would keep them in my prayers this week.

St. Gregory the Great, St. Cecilia, St, John the Baptist, and all you heavenly angelic choirs--pray for them and all church musicians. May God renew these servants in body, mind, heart, and soul. May He bless them abundantly.

Think of me kindly, those who are there and know of me.